Publications

Education Ministers’ Policy Statement on Fair Dealing

The CMEC Copyright Consortium developed this statement to underscore its support for the educational use of the fair dealing provision of the current Copyright Act and for the copyright policies and procedures in use by elementary and secondary schools in response to the 2012 Supreme Court of Canada decision on copyright and the educational use of fair dealing.

The CMEC Copyright Consortium is composed of all provinces and territories, with the exception of Quebec.

Categories: Copyright, Elementary and secondary education, Teachers and Teaching

Copyright Matters! 4th Edition now available

Copyright Matters! covers items from the Canadian Copyright Act and its regulations, contractual and tariff arrangements with copyright collectives, and court decisions. The publication is a starting point in increasing awareness of your rights and obligations in selecting and using copyright-protected materials for teaching and learning.

Categories: Copyright, Teaching tools and Resources

Copyright Bulletin #5

Educational organizations are asking the federal government to change the existing copyright law in order to make it clear that educational use of publicly available Internet material is not an infringement of copyright. This bulletin explains the importance of the change and the legal uncertainties associated with the term "implied licence."

Categories: Copyright, Teaching tools and Resources

Copyright Bulletin #1

Teachers, students, and schools - elementary, secondary, colleges, and universities - need an amendment to the Copyright Act that would allow them to use materials on the Internet that are publicly available for anyone to use, without fear that they are breaking the law. This bulletin explains why the amendment is necessary in an educational context.

Categories: Copyright, Teaching tools and Resources

Copying Internet Resources in Schools

Copyright infringement is of key concern to educators and authorities across the country. The education sector believes that clarity and balance in the Copyright Act must be vigorously championed, so that copyright infringement is eliminated and every student and teacher can be assured of timely and fair access to Internet materials. To this end, the provincial and territorial ministers responsible for education across Canada, in collaboration with teachers, school boards, colleges, universities, and professors, have proposed to the Government of Canada that it enact an education amendment to the Copyright Act to permit the educational use of freely available Internet materials. This document explains the proposed amendment.

Categories: Copyright, Teaching tools and Resources

Statement on Copyright

This statement on copyright outlines the position of the provinces and territories on education-related copyright issues and advocates for the adoption of amendments that reflect this position.

Categories: Copyright

Copyright Bulletin #3

Educational institutions and their students, teachers, and staff use the Internet in unique ways, some of which may infringe copyright laws. Educational users require an amendment to the Copyright Act that makes it clear that no infringement occurs when publicly available Internet material is used for educational purposes. This bulletin discusses the ambiguity of the "deal fairly" phrase in the Copyright Act, with regard to educational use.

Categories: Copyright, Teaching tools and Resources

Copyright Bulletin #2

Education organizations are asking the federal government to change the existing copyright law in order to make it clear that educational use of publicly available Internet material is not an infringement of copyright. This bulletin clarifies the intentions and the implications of the amendment requested by educational organizations.

Categories: Copyright, Teaching tools and Resources

Copyright Bulletin #4

Educational organizations are asking the federal government to change the existing copyright law in order to make it clear that educational use of publicly available Internet material is not an infringement of copyright. This bulletin responds to the concern that the educational amendment implies that anyone not in the educational community would have to pay to use publicly available Internet materials.

Categories: Copyright, Teaching tools and Resources

Discussion Paper on Digital Copyright Issues

The Copyright Forum, the author of this paper, serves as a venue for the discussion of digital copyright issues of interest to Canadian educational institutions, libraries, archives, and museums. The forum comprises 13 national associations, including the CMEC Copyright Consortium. The purpose of this discussion paper is to outline the forum's perspective on major issues that must be addressed in revising the Copyright Act to make it a more effective instrument for achieving public-policy objectives in a digital environment. The paper highlights the key issues, sets out a number of principles underlying the forum's approach, and makes a series of specific recommendations regarding the revision of the Copyright Act.

Categories: Copyright, Information and Communication Technologies